Content Is King, But A Plan Is Your Dynasty: Build Your Kingdom With These Royal Tips

Content Is King, But A Plan Is Your Dynasty: Build Your Kingdom With These Royal Tips

Taming the content monster isn’t necessarily the bonus hour of most people’s day. Writing can be an arduous process that requires effort, patience, and time to get right. If the ‘Content is King’ mantra hasn’t yet been beaten into your head, you better get with the program quick: If you want your site to show up in organic search, you have some work to do.

I’m going to assume you understand the implications of publishing content on your site: it leads to better rankings, higher traffic, more conversions. Backlinks are becoming a thing of the past. Not to say that they are not still important, but the true deciding factor these days is where are those links coming from? If you’re not picking up links from authoritative sites you run the risk of getting whacked by Google. Penguins and Panda bears might be cute in the zoo. Not so when it comes to your website.

I Don’t Know Where To Start!

A lot of people have questions about producing “good” content. While there is no exact science, there is a simple formula to producing content on the regular. Consistency is what pays off. Add to the fact that the more you write, the better you become. You need a content calendar, and you need a plan.

What a content calendar allows you to do is structure the content you publish to target your buyer personas. A content calendar also helps you match content with current promotions and marketing initiatives. Still another benefit of creating a content calendar for your website is it keeps you on track and gives you a deadline. It beats wasting time thinking about what you should be writing about.

Plan your content calendar with these resources:

17 Essential Content Templates and Checklists

How to Create an Editorial Calendar Using Trello (and Why You Need One)

How to Build a Content Calendar (Plus a Free Template for 2014)

Master The Outline

How you structure your articles is important. If your plan of attack is laid out before you, all it requires is filling in the blanks. All great posts start with a title. It has to be catchy. People should want to click. Your title should arouse the curiosity of your readers.

As Rita Mailheau says:

Get your headline right and people will start to read. Get your lede right, and they’ll keep reading. It isn’t hard. You just need to know how to do it.

I would recommend reading her article. It explains perfectly how to structure your content. Just for an overview, here is a quick cheat sheet:

1. Start with a title. Your title should set the tone of your article and be your compass for the content that follows.

2. The Lede. This is the first paragraph that should tell the reader the main purpose of your article. Balance being informative and intriguing to keep the reader engaged and wanting to read more.

3. Outline your main points. Brevity is important in writing, and so is breaking up your content with headings. Blobs of text are hard to read and will end up causing you to lose visitors. Headings help readers quickly scan your content, which is the new way people read online (if you haven’t heard).

4. Fill-in-the-blanks. Once you have your title, lede, and your headings mapped out, all you have to do is fill in the blanks. You set yourself up for success when you map out your articles this way. You’ll notice that you write faster and your articles are far more cohesive.

5. Write a long post. While you should never write strictly for word count, there is evidence that longer posts perform better across the board in terms of rankings, social shares and authority.

Don’t Skimp On Promotion

Just because you hit publish doesn’t mean your job is finished. Your job is just beginning. Promotion is the second half and you should definitely put in some time to get the word out. If you need an exhaustive guide to getting this part done, this post covers it.

Here are some ways you can promote your new post:

  • Share on social media (duh!)
  • Mention people in your post
  • Send trackbacks to sites you linked to
  • Comment on other people’s blogs

Don’t Ignore SEO, But Don’t Go Overboard

Semantic search seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding searcher intent and the contextual meaning of terms as they appear in search results. This means that Google is getting better at understanding search queries that mimic human speech and intent. Heavy keyword usage is no longer advisable. You can include your keywords, but never forget that you are writing for people, not search engines.

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Post Written by
Greg Middlesworth is the owner of URLjet.

1 Comment

  1. Greg says:

    You bet! Glad you liked it and thank you for the expert info!

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